Scott Bolduc

Founder Of Electronic Mobility Controls

Scott Bolduc, creator of Electronic Mobility Controls and the Aevit 2.0 system has contributed incalculable innovations to the automotive drive-by-wire industry. Through research and experimentation he has created technology that continues to this day to provide freedom and mobility to all levels of disability. It also has practical applications for Private, Military, and Commercial sectors. In the years since its inception he has created an impressive company that's become known as the leader in adaptive driving technology for those with physical disabilities. As a boy Scott grew up in Waterville, Maine where he showed an interest in invention from a very early age.

 

Scott Bolduc, creator of Electronic Mobility Controls and the Aevit 2.0 system has contributed incalculable innovations to the automotive drive-by-wire industry. Through research and experimentation he has created technology that continues to this day to provide freedom and mobility to all levels of disability. It also has practical applications for Private, Military, and Commercial sectors. In the years since its inception he has created an impressive company that's become known as the leader in adaptive driving technology for those with physical disabilities. As a boy Scott grew up in Waterville, Maine where he showed an interest in invention from a very early age.

At around 10, he made a fuel gauge for his parents kerosene tank in their basement. The idea was so interesting that at the time Honeywell, a thermostat manufacturer, paid him for his idea. But that’s not all, at the age of 15 he was able to watch the Apollo launch at NASA by winning a prize for writing a scientific essay. As a senior of Waterville High-School he won a 4-year scholarship from the Air Force to attend Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Florida.  In his 20’s his friend, Dale Crafts, was involved in a motorcycle accident and became a quadriplegic.

At around 10, he made a fuel gauge for his parents kerosene tank in their basement. The idea was so interesting that at the time Honeywell, a thermostat manufacturer, paid him for his idea. But that’s not all, at the age of 15 he was able to watch the Apollo launch at NASA by winning a prize for writing a scientific essay. As a senior of Waterville High-School he won a 4-year scholarship from the Air Force to attend Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Florida.  In his 20’s his friend, Dale Crafts, was involved in a motorcycle accident and became a quadriplegic.

Determined to help him in any way he could, he began developing what would become the world's first drive by wire system. Scott’s idea of drive-by-wire technology was in part derived from his knowledge of flying military aircraft. They relied on servo motors to control various parts of the mechanics of the plane under the stress of supersonic speeds and  high g-force exertion. This allows the pilot to operate the craft with little effort as the linkage is no longer mechanical which would require a huge exertion of force, under heavy physical stress from the speeds you reach in flight

Determined to help him in any way he could, he began developing what would become the world's first drive by wire system. Scott’s idea of drive-by-wire technology was in part derived from his knowledge of flying military aircraft. They relied on servo motors to control various parts of the mechanics of the plane under the stress of supersonic speeds and  high g-force exertion. This allows the pilot to operate the craft with little effort as the linkage is no longer mechanical which would require a huge exertion of force, under heavy physical stress from the speeds you reach in flight.

He then generated the idea that the same technology could be adapted to the automotive sector to allow people to interface with their transportation in a modified way as well. He imagined an electronic user interface that would fuse the Gas, Brakes, Steering, and secondary controls into one system that then could be operated by a user with limited physical functioning. Scott went on to his next pursuit of designing equipment for a whole new wave of technology that would allow people of all levels of ability to interface with their vehicle.

He then generated the idea that the same technology could be adapted to the automotive sector to allow people to interface with their transportation in a modified way as well. He imagined an electronic user interface that would fuse the Gas, Brakes, Steering, and secondary controls into one system that then could be operated by a user with limited physical functioning. Scott went on to his next pursuit of designing equipment for a whole new wave of technology that would allow people of all levels of ability to interface with their vehicle.

With a belief that all people could have equal access to the freedom and independence transportation gives he set off on his next journey to innovate a space that hadn’t truly been created yet. Scott was able to develop some of the early technology, as well as get his first of 21 patents. On October 31, 1990 Scott received a patent for his “Joystick-Operated Driving System” known as (Digi-Drive) which would become his first iteration of a drive-by-wire system. Digi-drive was also the first high level driving system that could be manufactured and shipped to a dealer network for installation.

With a belief that all people could have equal access to the freedom and independence transportation gives he set off on his next journey to innovate a space that hadn’t truly been created yet. Scott was able to develop some of the early technology, as well as get his first of 21 patents. On October 31, 1990 Scott received a patent for his “Joystick-Operated Driving System” known as (Digi-Drive) which would become his first iteration of a drive-by-wire system. Digi-drive was also the first high level driving system that could be manufactured and shipped to a dealer network for installation.

On August 29, 1994 Scott received a patent for the single unit system for controlling gas and brake that was known in the industry as EGB (Electronic Gas Brake). In the early 2000’s EMC made a quantum leap to the new A.E.V.I.T (Advanced Electronic Vehicle Interface Technology) system for automobiles. Scott has always championed the need for safety and extensive testing for adaptive equipment.  Digi-Drive became the first Joystick driving system approved by the Veterans Administration. The EMC product line has gone through extensive testing wherever it was available including The TUV and ISO-9000. On December 15, 2005 Scott received a patent for the first Auxiliary Battery System (Aux-Bat).

On August 29, 1994 Scott received a patent for the single unit system for controlling gas and brake that was known in the industry as EGB (Electronic Gas Brake). In the early 2000’s EMC made a quantum leap to the new A.E.V.I.T (Advanced Electronic Vehicle Interface Technology) system for automobiles. Scott has always championed the need for safety and extensive testing for adaptive equipment.  Digi-Drive became the first Joystick driving system approved by the Veterans Administration. The EMC product line has gone through extensive testing wherever it was available including The TUV and ISO-9000. On December 15, 2005 Scott received a patent for the first Auxiliary Battery System (Aux-Bat).

With the development of the AEVIT system, data logging of all motor positioning and inputs was available for the first time in 2005, and in 2008 the first touch screen for secondary functions became available. The Smithsonian Institute National Museum of American History states that Scott created one of the most significant adaptive mobility technologies of the 20th century. Scott’s contributions to the industry are immeasurable and his legacy will continue In Electronic Mobility Controls as the company continues to advance the technology necessary to interface with today's ever evolving vehicles.

With the development of the AEVIT system, data logging of all motor positioning and inputs was available for the first time in 2005, and in 2008 the first touch screen for secondary functions became available. The Smithsonian Institute National Museum of American History states that Scott created one of the most significant adaptive mobility technologies of the 20th century. Scott’s contributions to the industry are immeasurable and his legacy will continue In Electronic Mobility Controls as the company continues to advance the technology necessary to interface with today's ever evolving vehicles.